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Safari Journal - December 2018


Bears Ears National Monument - Utah

One treasure still inside the Bears Ears monument is Procession Panel, a nearly 23-foot-long rock carving, or petroglyph, on Comb Ridge. At least 1,000 years old, it depicts a ceremonial gathering of some 190 human-like forms converging from four directions. A succession of prehistoric cultures occupied the mesas and canyons of southern Utah for more than 12,000 years.

One treasure still inside the Bears Ears monument is Procession Panel, a nearly 23-foot-long rock carving, or petroglyph, on Comb Ridge. At least 1,000 years old, it depicts a ceremonial gathering of some 190 human-like forms converging from four directions. A succession of prehistoric cultures occupied the mesas and canyons of southern Utah for more than 12,000 years.

Arch Canyon is still protected within Bears Ears National Monument, but other canyons and thousands of Native American archaeological sites now lie outside the monument’s newly reduced—and still contested—borders. The monument is named after the twin buttes on the horizon, which are held sacred by local tribes.


This National Geographic article:

INSIDE THE NEW BATTLE FOR THE AMERICAN WEST

The push to cut back federally protected lands is fueling a dispute rooted in our history and culture. The big question: Whose land is it?

By HANNAH NORDHAUS

Photgraphy by AARON HUEY


Bears Ears: A Story of Homelands

For native peoples of the Colorado Plateau, the Bears Ears region is home. For hundreds of generations, their ancestors lived, raised their children, and buried their elders here. Their artists carved figures and left handprints on the rock walls. Clues about their daily lives—baskets, pottery, tools, and weapons—still remain.

The labyrinthine canyons, solitary hoodoos, verdant hanging gardens, and lush meadows of the Bears Ears region are also beloved by hikers, climbers, and other visitors who soak up the splendor, star-filled nights, and natural quiet of Utah’s ruggedly beautiful public lands. 

Presented by the Grand Canyon Trust

  • Text - Heather Herold

  • Editor - Ashley Davidson

  • Story map - Stephanie Smith

  • Special thanks to - Tim Peterson, Blake McCord, Friends of Cedar Mesa (opening video), Josh Ewing,  Jared Fehr, Jonathan Bailey, Marc Coles-Ritchie, Ingrid Taylar, Malcolm, NPS, and Roman Lacobucci for the use of your beautiful images.


Wildlife of This Area

Lynx family

From Wikipedia

lynx (/lɪŋks/;[2] plural lynx or lynxes[3]) is any of the four species (Canada lynxIberian lynxEurasian lynxBobcat) within the medium-sized wild cat genus Lynx. The name "lynx" originated in Middle English via Latin from the Greek word λύγξ,[2] derived from the Indo-European root leuk- ("light, brightness")[4] in reference to the luminescence of its reflective eyes.[4]

This video show a heated conversation between two Canadian Lynxes.

Lynx-video.jpg

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (Arizona)

Another area of the West that is effected by the recent federal legislation is Vermilion National Monument.


Archived Issues

October 2018


Advertisement

Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center (SWCC) rescues native wild animals that have lost their homes to development, or are found injured, orphaned, or abandoned. When possible, the animals in our care are rehabilitated and released — healthy and wild — back where they belong.

Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center (SWCC) rescues native wild animals that have lost their homes to development, or are found injured, orphaned, or abandoned. When possible, the animals in our care are rehabilitated and released — healthy and wild — back where they belong.

Since 1985, the Grand Canyon Trust has worked to protect and restore the Colorado Plateau.

Since 1985, the Grand Canyon Trust has worked to protect and restore the Colorado Plateau.